Botswana – Mabuasehube and Maun

 Tsabong,  the first town after entering  Botswana at McCarthy’s Rest

Springbok Bar, Tsabong

 We withdrew some Pula from an ATM and filled up with diesel at 7.26 Pula per litre (about R9.30) What a pleasure! 

We were told that Jill had closed Berry Bush farm where we stayed last tIme. She had not been well.

The first 60 kilometers of the route to Mabuasehube was on good gravel that had recently been graded and we made good time. Then we hit the sand! It was as if everybody that had gone this way before had made their own track. It was a mess! Our Landcruiser took it in its stride and we managed a steady 40 kph in 3rd gear high range.

There was a bit of confusion when we booked in at the gate, the head office was offline. We could stay where we liked and sort it out on departure.

We were so lucky with our timing…The pan was filled with water. A rare event!

Mabuasehube Pan with water!

We headed for campsite #1 where I thought we were booked, but it was occupied by a couple, Charles and Emma, who were leaving the next day. We returned to site #4 which was vacant and set up there.

Set up and ready for drinks in 5 minutes at Camp #4

 It was in a beautiful position on top of a hill overlooking the pan. Equipped with a drop toilet, no water, no shower, an A- frame shelter, fire pit and plenty of trees. 

Camp #4 setup on top of a hill

There were a number of small creatures that had taken up permanent residence here.

The butterflies everywhere after the rains

And this friendly creature looking for a handout

Friendly Ground Squirrel

The sunset at camp #4 was beautiful and very relaxing

Sunset with reflections in the pan

And dawn the following morning was also spectacular

Dawn at Mabuasehube camp #4

We could overlook the plain filled with grazing Springbok in the fresh new grass without having to leave camp 

Our view from camp

Later that day we drove over to camp #1 on a cliffside overlooking the pan. We decided to camp right on the edge instead of in the campsite as there were no facilities there either and it lacked the spectacular view.

George came with us this time too!

That evening we witnessed an approaching storm. Fortunately we escaped the main force of the wind and rain,

We were in awe of the spectacular sunsets and views

On our last day we could already see the water in the pan was receding and these Gemsbok had no difficulty crossing.

Gemsbok at Mabuasehube

Our route out took us back on the same road to Tsabong as recommended by the officials at the gate. It was a long days drive to Kang Ultra where we enjoyed wonderful hot showers for the first time in 4 days but our stay at Mabuasehube was really worthwhile. Between Kang and Ghanzi the road had many cows, goats, donkeys and horses. There is also a lot of heavy traffic on the Trans Kalahari highway and unfortunately this horse was probably killed by a truck.

Road Kill

We had another long days drive to Maun which was taxing not only because  of the animals in the road, but also dodging  the potholes!

Our first nights camp was at Maun Rest Camp 

Carol had given us this teacloth with these meaningful words as seen in this photo and Solveig turned the cloth into a much needed apron. 

Meaningful words, so fitting to our journey

While in Maun we visited Birgit and Reiner who have supplied our shop for many years with cloth used in jackets. They make regular trips to West Africa and Central Africa to purchase African treasures. Always good to see them and visit their stunning home. 

Our next night was spent at the iconic restcamp, Audi Camp.

Swimming pool area at Audi

We could never come this far and into this region without a visit to N’Gepi. Even though it was in the Zambezi region in Namibia it was worth the detour. We left Maun and took the route on the western side of the Okavango swamp once again. This time we decided to try a different campsite and chose Drotsky Camp  on the banks of the Okavango River. Words are hard to find to describe the serenity and beauty of this place secluded under huge trees covered in vines.

Drotsky camp

The next day, a border crossing  and a short distance of less than 50 kilometers  to N’Gepi……

About Ian & Solveig's Overland Adventures

Although we never achieved our original goal of reaching Norway overland, our experience was so unexpectedly rewarding that we've not been able to settled down again! So we added new destinations to our lust for adventure. We hope that you will join us in sharing new exciting places and encounters with the amazing people we meet along the way.
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